French Farmhouse Project Report for 1/12/20

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Well, this last week was not as French as I had hoped would be. We no sooner resolved the issue with my computer when my car hesitated and stalled on acceleration, plus it was making a weird rattling noise.  The dealer, the import mechanic here in town, and Google are at odds with each other regarding the issue. Whatever is going on involves the bearings, but the dispute was over which set and the cause of the hesitating.

In related news, the hunt for the best Prius at the best price is under way.

On the French living front, I made a very French dinner last week: blanquette de poulet with roasted potatoes. It provided an antidote to the car-related chaos as well as the cold weather. The recipe for the blanquette is Mimi Thorisson’s from her book A Kitchen in France. The potatoes are in the book, but not on the website for some reason.

While it is technically a recipe for blanquette de veau, we just aren’t into veal around here. I used chicken legs (remove the skin or it will make a greasy mess). This would probably work well with turkey, too.

Yes, it is rich (I used sour cream, not creme fraiche, and it worked perfectly well). Yes, it is time consuming. Yes, there are a lot of ingredients. But it provided a counterbalance to the stress of the day. And it made the house smell great.

Hubby commented that he felt like he was eating in a high end French restaurant. Not long after that, he dozed off in his chair.

I smiled, knowing my job for the day was done.

Les restes et leures retournees, or Leftovers and Their Returns

Does anyone use leftovers anymore? I wonder about that when I hear about so much food getting tossed. 

I’m not judging anyone. I’m as guilty as anyone else of letting the glass and plastic containers with a couple of bites of this and a morsel of that stack up in the fridge. There are days when having it declared a preserve for endangered single cell life forms is a viable option.  

In Patricia Wells’ Bistrot Cooking, she details some creative uses for leftovers, a/k/a les restes, a la Francaise. A little sauce, a fresh salad, et voila! There’s a perfectly good new meal from the gigot a sept heures (leg of lamb cooked for seven hours) or the roast chicken. 

My own specialties are Thai or Indian curries, soups, and things wrapped in tortillas. Broth and cheese go a long way to stretch the meal while making it good.